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Faculty

Robert J. SklenarRobert J. Sklenar

Associate Professor and Associate Head
Department of Classics 
1108 McClung Tower 
The University of Tennessee 
Knoxville, TN 37996-0413

Phone: (865) 974-6950 
Fax: (865) 974-7173
rsklenar@utk.edu


  • Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1996
  • J.D., University of Michigan, 1991
  • M.A., Princeton University, 1988
  • B.A., University of Michigan 1985  
  • Associate Professor, Department of Classics, University of Tennessee, 2009-
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2003-2009
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Studies, Tulane University, 2002-2003
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Swarthmore College, 1997-2000, 2001-2002 (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow 1997-1999)
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin, University of Michigan, 2000-2001
  • Instructor in Latin, The Emerson School, 1996-1997

Book

  • Plant of a Strange Vine: Oratio Corrupta and the Poetics of Senecan Tragedy. Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 363, Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 2017.
  • The Taste for Nothingness: A Study of Virtus and Related Themes in Lucan's Bellum Civile. University of Michigan Press, 2003.

Book Chapter

  • "Lucan the Formalist." In Brill's Companion to Lucan, ed. Paolo Asso. Leiden and Boston 2011, 317-326.

Articles and Reviews

  • “Poetic Autobiography and Literary Polemic in Catullus 16,” Paideia 73 (2018), forthcoming.
  • Antje Wessels, Ästhetisierung und ästhetische Erfahrung von Gewalt: Eine Untersuchung zu Senecas Tragödien (Heidelberg 2014), Gnomon 88 (2016) 512-514.
  • Review of Henry J.M. Day, Lucan and the Sublime: Power, Representation and Aesthetic Experience (Cambridge and New York 2013), CP 110 (2015) 179-184.
  • "Sopor y ebriedad: puntos de contacto entre Eneida 9 y Eneida 2," Auster 18 (2013) 7-13. (Translated from the English by M. Vizzotti and P. Martínez Astorino)
  • Review of Lee Fratantuono, Madness Triumphant: a Reading of Lucan's Pharsalia (Lanham, MD 2012), BMCR 2013 (unpaginated).  
  • Review of Paul Roche, Lucan: De Bello Civili Book 1, Edited with Introduction, Text, and Commentary (Oxford 2009), Gnomon 83 (2011) 174-175.
  • "Sappho Boemica: A Reading of Jaroslav Vrchlický's 'Sapfó'," Kosmas: Czechoslovak and Central European Journal 22.2 (2009) 103-110.
  • Review of Francesca D'Alessandro Behr, Feeling History: Lucan, Stoicism, and the Poetics of Passion (Columbus 2007), CJ 104.1 (2008) 80-82.
  • "Anti-Petronian Elements in The Great Gatsby," The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review 6 (2007-08) 121-128.
  • "Seneca, Oedipus 980-994: How Stoic a Chorus?" CJ 103.2 (2007-08) 183-195.
  • "How to Dress (for) an Epyllion: The Fabrics of Catullus 64," Hermes 134 (2006) 385-397.
  • "Ausonius's Elegiac Wife: Epigram 20 and the Traditions of Latin Love Poetry," CJ 101 (2005) 51-62.
  • "Sources and Individuality in Two Passages of Livy," Historia 53 (2004) 302-310
  • "The Cosm(et)ology of Claudian's 'In Sepulchrum Speciosae'," HSCP 101 (2003) 483-487.
  • "Jaroslav Vrchlický's 'Akme' and Catullus 45," CW 94 (2001) 173-177.
  • "Nihilistic Cosmology and Catonian Ethics in Lucan's Bellum Civile," AJP 120 (1999) 281-296.
  • "La République des Signes: Caesar, Cato, and the Language of Sallustian Morality," TAPA 128 (1998) 205-220.
  • "The Centrality of the Civic Image in Droste's Mondesaufgang," Droste-Jahrbuch 3 (1997) 127-134.
  • "Catullus 36: Beyond Literary Polemics," RBPh 74 (1996) 57-59.
  • "Papinian on the Interdict unde vi," RIDA 41 (1994) 379-389.
  • "SEG XXXII 1243, 13-15," RhM 136 (1993) 93-94.
  • "Rullus's Colonies: Cicero, De Lege Agraria 1.16-17 and 2.73-75," Eos 80 (1992) 81-82.
  • "Multiple Structural Divisions in Horace, Odes 1.38," PP 46 (1991) 444-448.
  • "Horace, Odes 1.3," AC 60 (1991) 266-269.
  • "The Death of Priam: 'Aeneid' 2.506-558," Hermes 118 (1990) 67-75.

Translations

  • "Aeneas and the Sibyl (Aeneid 6.268-272)," CO 85 (2008) 81.
  • "Caroli Baudelaire Elegia de hoste," CO 84 (2006) 22. (Baudelaire's "L'Ennemi" translated into Latin elegiac couplets)
  • "The Watchman's Monologue (Aeschylus, Agamemnon 1-39)," Small Craft Warnings, Spring 2000, 69-70.
  • "Propertius 1.21 (Gallus' Farewell)," The Formalist Vol. 11, No. 1 (2000), 119.
  • "Charles Baudelaire: To The Reader," Small Craft Warnings, Winter 2000, 71-72.
  • "Karel Hlavacek: Impromptu," Small Craft Warnings, Spring 1999, 55.
  • "Rainer Maria Rilke: Autumn Day," The Formalist, Vol. 4, No. 1 (1993), 14.
  • "Charles Baudelaire: Meditation," The Formalist, Vol. 3, No. 1 (1992), 101.
  • “Poetic Autobiography and Literary Polemic in Catullus 16.” Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS)-Southern Section, Atlanta, 2016.
  • “Langage, société, et cosmos dans le premier monologue de l’Œdipe de Sénèque.” Classical Association of Canada/Société Canadienne des Études ClassiquesQuébec City, 2016.
  • “Ruined Landscapes and Forgotten Songs in Vergil’s Ninth Eclogue.” CAMWS, Waco,  2014.
  • “Sabina’s Poetic Embroidery: A Reading of Ausonius, Epigrams 27-29.” CAMWS, Baton Rouge, 2012.
  • “Of Lambs and Mistresses: Patterns of Contradiction in Tibullus Book 1.” CAMWS, Grand Rapids, 2011.
  • “Seneca the Younger and Neronian Aesthetics.” CAMWS, Oklahoma City, 2010.
  •  “Karel Hlaváček’s Ithaca.”  CAMWS-Southern Section, Richmond, 2010.
  • “Lucan the Formalist.” CAMWS-Southern Section, Asheville, 2008.
  • “Anti-Petronian Elements in The Great Gatsby,” CAAS 2007, CAMWS, Tucson, 2008.
  • “Seneca’s 114th Letter and the Poetics of Decadence,” CAMWS, Cincinnati, 2007; longer version: Wednesday Humanities Lunch, University of Tennessee, 2007.
  • “Seneca, Oedipus 980-994: How Stoic a Chorus?” CAMWS-Southern Section, Memphis, 2006.
  • Sappho Boemica: A Reading of Jaroslav Vrchlický’s ‘Sapfó’,” CAMWS, Gainvesville, 2006.
  • “Ausonius’s Elegiac Wife: Epigram 20 and the Traditions of Latin Love Poetry,” CAMWS, St. Louis, 2004.
  • “How to Dress (for) an Epyllion: The Fabrics of Catullus 64.” CAMWS, Lexington, 2003.
  • “Jaroslav Vrchlický’s‘Akmé,’ Catullus 45, and the Poetics of Adaptation,” CAMWS, Knoxville, 2000.
  • “Lucan’s Curio and the Problem of ‘Decadent’ Epic,” CAMWS, Cleveland, 1999.
  • “Caesar, Cato, and the Language of Sallustian Morality,” American Philological Association,  Chicago, 1997.
  • “Cato at the Shrine of Ammon (Lucan, BC 9.564-586):  A Study in Stoic Futility,” CAMWS, Boulder, 1997.
  • “River-Fighting in Statius,” CAMWS, Omaha, 1995.
  • Tennessee Humanities Center Fellowship, 2013-14
  • UT Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2010
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Mellon Fellowship in the Humanities, Mellon Dissertation Grant

Courses Taught at UT

  • Classics 111 and 112 (Beginning Latin)
  • Classics121 and 122 (Beginning Greek)
  • Classics150 (Latin Transition)
  • Classics 251 and 252 (Intermediate Latin)
  • Classics 253 (Greek and Roman Literature in English Translation)
  • Classics 261 (Intermediate Greek)
  • Classics 273 (Medical Terminology)
  • Classics 352 (Roman Lyric Poetry)
  • Classics 401 (Greek Poetry)
  • Classics 431 and 432 (Select Readings in Latin Literature)
  • Classics 593 (Independent Study)
  • Linguistics 423 (Development of Diachronic and Synchronic Linguistics)

Subjects Taught at Other Institutions

  • Latin (all undergraduate levels), Honors Seminar on Horace (Swarthmore College), Greek and Roman Civilization, Classical Mythology, Greek Prose Composition

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